Thursday, 27 August 2015

What to do if the low FODMAP diet doesn’t work for you?

By Lucy Taylor (Accredited Practising Dietitian)



The low FODMAP diet has been shown to improve gastrointestinal symptoms in 3 out of 4 people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), meaning a small percentage of people with this condition do not respond to the diet. So what should you do if you think you’re a ‘non-responder’? 

Saturday, 22 August 2015

Marinated Tofu with Asian Greens & Rice

By Lucy Taylor (Accredited Practising Dietitian)



How tasty does this look? It is both vegan & vegetarian friendly too!
We also have a tasty scrambled tofu recipe too, click here if you haven't seen it yet!

Thursday, 20 August 2015

FAQ: Why are there differences between the Monash App & other publicly available sources?

Easy ways to use tofu for vegetarians and vegans (+Scrambled tofu recipe)

By Lucy Taylor (Accredited Practising Dietitian)



Following the low FODMAPs diet as a vegetarian or vegan can make it difficult to include protein-rich foods with main meals, as most of the legumes and lentils are high or moderate in galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) to be included in the diet or are only classed as ‘Low' in small quantities (1/4 cup of chickpeas or 1/2 cup of tinned brown lentils).

Plain Tofu and tempeh are great alternatives to legumes as they are low in FODMAPs and a good source of protein, iron and zinc, which makes them nutritious foods for people on plant-based diets. 

Many people are unsure of how to incorporate tofu into their diets, so here is one way you can include tofu into your low FODMAP diet. This scrambled tofu recipe is a great option for people who prefer a savoury breakfast, or a quick and easy dinner meal!

Stay tuned to see our next vegetarian/vegan recipe "Marinated Tofu" which will be coming out this coming SAT 22nd Aug 2015.

Wednesday, 19 August 2015

Response to article published in Britain’s Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

Recently, an article was published in Britain’s Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB) that raised questions about the evidence-based research on the low FODMAP diet, “Does a low FODMAP diet help IBS?”  We welcome robust questioning and believe that scientific debate is always productive.  However, when so many people around the world suffer significant pain and discomfort from IBS and with so few treatment options available to give relief, it is prudent and appropriate to respond to some of the limitations of the study cited in this article.

This response is offered to help our global community better understand the discussion posed by the anonymous author of the paper, and - importantly - to recognise some of the limitations that this study highlights when assessing a diet’s efficacy against the usual frameworks applied to a formulated and controlled drug therapy.

Monday, 10 August 2015

Table of Contents


Avoiding wheat – how strict on a low FODMAP diet [Gluten-free: Part 2/2]

By Caroline Tuck (PhD Candidate & Accredited Practising Dietitian)

During the restrictive phase of a low FODMAP diet, wheat intake is reduced.



Wheat intake is reduced because it contains high levels of fructans, one of the oligosaccharides (a type of carbohydrate). Other high fructan grains include rye and barley. Therefore, during the strict phase of a low FODMAP diet, intake of wheat, rye and barley should be limited. However – it is important to note that this does NOT mean that you require a strict wheat-free or gluten-free diet when following the low FODMAP diet.

When removing the main sources of wheat from your diet, such as bread, pasta and cereals, we recommend that these are replaced by suitable alternatives. See table below for examples.

Avoiding wheat – how strict on a low FODMAP diet [Gluten-free: Part 2/2]

By Caroline Tuck (PhD Candidate & Accredited Practising Dietitian)

During the restrictive phase of a low FODMAP diet, wheat intake is reduced.



Wheat intake is reduced because it contains high levels of fructans, one of the oligosaccharides (a type of carbohydrate). Other high fructan grains include rye and barley. Therefore, during the strict phase of a low FODMAP diet, intake of wheat, rye and barley should be limited. However – it is important to note that this does NOT mean that you require a strict wheat-free or gluten-free diet when following the low FODMAP diet.

When removing the main sources of wheat from your diet, such as bread, pasta and cereals, we recommend that these are replaced by suitable alternatives. See table below for examples.

Friday, 7 August 2015

Android App update version 1.3. It’s here!


[NOTE: This app update is for Android only devices. Stay tuned for the iPhone/iPad 1.5 version release to come!]


   



We are very excited to announce our big app update! Android Version 1.3 is here and ready for you to download. 

This update is free for all of those who already have the app downloaded on your Android device.

After many months of work, our team has tested the FODMAP content of over 150 new and exotic foods and these are included in this current app update!

There have also been a few technological changes, which we believe will enhance usability of the app. It will now be easier for the Monash FODMAP team to update the app as new foods are tested. This means you have the most up-to-date information about the FODMAP content of food too! But, to receive these app updates, it is VERY important that you have Wi-Fi or 3G access when downloading the app for the first time. See our FAQ section for explanations & some helpful tips if you are experiencing any problems!

We are constantly thinking of ways to improve the app, so thank you to those who have emailed through suggestions, general feedback and bug reports to: fodmap.feedback@monash.edu.

So…. Tell me more?

Monday, 3 August 2015

Gluten-free or FODMAPs, the culprit? [Gluten-free: 1/2]



It has been long observed that patients on a gluten-free diet often reported improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms. This led to the underlying belief that gluten in wheat to be the culprit causing all these gut conditions.

However, findings from studies conducted at Monash University had found that: