Wednesday, 3 December 2014

Getting enough fibre on a low FODMAP diet

By Dr Jane Varney



Achieving an adequate fibre intake can be a challenge for people following a low FODMAP diet as the diet excludes many high fibre foods. These include certain types of legumes and pulses, some types of grains and cereals and some types of fruits and vegetables. Despite this difficulty, a fibre intake of 25-30g per day is recommended for people with IBS. This recommendation is consistent with the recommended fibre intake for the general population. So how might you boost your fibre intake while following a low FODMAP diet? Here are some ideas:

·      Snack on low FODMAP fruit such as bananas, raspberries, rhubarb, kiwifruit, mandarin, strawberries, passionfruit and oranges

·      Include low FODMAP vegetables with your meals, for example carrot (skin on), green beans, potato (skin on), corn, silverbeet and eggplant (skin on)

·     Check food labels when buying low FODMAP bread and cereal products. Compare products in the per 100g column to find higher fibre options. Some examples include quinoa flakes, brown rice, gluten free multigrain bread, rice bran, oat bran, sourdough spelt bread and porridge (oats).

·      Add canned lentils/ canned chick peas to a casserole/salad. A ‘green’ or low FODMAP serve is considered ¼ cup of canned chickpeas or ½ cup of canned lentils. Rinse the canned lentils/chickpeas well before use to help reduce the FODMAP content.

·      Snack on almonds. A ‘green’ or low FODMAP serve of almonds is considered 10 nuts

·      Add oat bran or rice bran to your breakfast cereal. A ‘green’ or low FODMAP serve of oat or rice bran is considered 2 tablespoons 

·      Talk to your pharmacist about trying a fibre supplement made from sterculia. Stericulia is considered less ‘gas forming’ than other fibre supplements and may help to treat constipation in people with IBS. This said, few well designed studies have been conducted to measure the efficacy of this fibre supplement. 

        


22 comments:

  1. Thanks for this! Can you remind me - what is a low fodmap serving of porridge oats? And would this change with two tablespoons of oat bran added?

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    1. Having oats and oat bran together will increase your FODMAP intake, but you may find you tolerate both at the same time. A 1/2 cup serve of dry oats is amber, while a 1/4 cup serve is green. 2 tablespoons of oat bran is also a green serve. I would suggest trying oats in a green sized serve (1/4 cup). If this is tolerated well you could then try oats in an amber serve (1/2 cup). If this is well tolerated you could then try having a 1/2 cup serve of oats AND 2 tablespoons of oat bran. The food and symptom diary function in the app can help you to monitor your tolerance of new foods.

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  2. Sterculia is not available in the USA.

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  3. Will you test miso paste any time soon? I am confused since I have seen statements on the internet both that it is high and low in fodmaps. I would love to reintroduce it as a seasoning! I thought, isn't it logical that it would be low in fodmaps since it is fermented, just like soy sauce?

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    1. Hi Emilieskog,
      Miso paste is currently being tested & results will be out in our next app update, 1-2months time!
      If you don't yet know about our app, please see here: http://bit.ly/1PKfK3Y

      Kindly, Emily
      The Monash University low FODMAP team

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  4. Yes I would also love to know about psyllium :)

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    1. Me too I would like to know abot psyllium, please

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    2. My app, uploaded February 2016, still doesn't have psyllium in isolation. Is this low or high fodmap?

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    3. Yep, I'd like to know about psyllium husk too please :)

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  5. Another psyllium liker here...

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  6. Is psyllium currently being tested? Here in the UK it's difficult to find gluten free bread that hasn't got added psyllium. I wasn't worried about it before but just bought your app and noticed rice flakes with psyllium are moderate in fodmaps. Any further info would be much appreciated!

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  7. Would love to know about psyllium husk/powder

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  8. Just adding to the requests for psyllium :)

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  9. Is slippery elm power low fodmap? I use it to settle reflux/heartburn

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    1. Hi Nat, unfortunately we have not tested slippery elm powder so cannot comment on its FODMAP content. To test your own tolerance to untested foods, please see the following blog for guidance: http://bit.ly/1Upsw8K
      best wishes, The Monash FODMAP team

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  10. Hi there,

    Why the answer to one question for slippery elm but none to all the people curious about psyllium? I'd also like to know.

    Thank you!

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    1. Hi Jennifer,

      We have not measured the FODMAP content of psyllium, but we do know that it is a fermentable fibre that is tolerated by some, but not all. Stericulia(Normacol) is considered less gas forming than other fibre supplements. We recommend you talk to your dietitian about including fibre supplements in your diet. All the best, the Monash FODMAP team.

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  11. How about Acacia Tummy Fiber, sold in the US as Heather's Tummy Fiber?
    Geri

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  12. Hi there I'm just also adding to the list of those wondering whether psyllium husk and slippery elm are low FODMAP. Thanks!

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